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Training once a week: Science confirmed Mike Mentzer’s method

Mike-Mentzer-method


Mike-Mentzer-method

Training once a week: Science confirmed Mike Mentzer’s method

The legendary Mike Mentzer, one of bodybuilding icon whose methodology training for decades attracted enormous public attention and which was the subject of endless debate. This giant is, in fact, found that almost all bodybuilders have a problem with overtraining, but during the week practicing far less time, while also winning some of the biggest prizes in the sport.
The man who is the first in history had won a competition with the maximum number of points, which in 1978 won the title of Mr. Universe and win the heavyweight Mr. Olympia.

Mentzer’s approach to training is quickly made him even more popular, and has gained thousands of followers to years later their number substantially reduced, because of its drastic reduction of muscle mass, and especially after he left this world too early, in the 49th year life.

His training was brutal, maximum intensity, in which each repetition performed slowly and completely correct. The exercises were performed to the limit, and it is considered that for achieving maximum stimulation of each muscle group separately, it is ideal to exercise 20 to 30 minutes. After such training he rested four days, however, or even up to 7 days to the next.

Although his approach lost a lot of popularity, now the last scientific study has proved that he was right.

Scientific research that included 70 healthy adults, which were then divided into two age groups, clarified is what this is all about.

In the first group were persons aged 20-35 years, while in the second the elderly from 60 to 75 years. During the first phase of the research, which lasted 16 weeks, both groups had three endurance training per week. After that, divided into three groups. The participants of the first group were totally stopped exercising, others have reduced the number of weekly training from three to one, while the third group of participants also reduce the number of training from three to one, but at the same time reduce the number of sets for each muscle group from three to one.

The results showed that the legendary Mentzer found a good approach. In other words, a group of older exercisers, no one has managed to maintain the same muscle mass than before reducing the number of training from three to one, with younger trainees was completely different situation. Both groups whose participants reduce the number of training from 3 to 1, and the number of sets of 3 to 1, the survey are completed with the same outcome, that muscle mass was held still.

However, the measurements after the completion of the entire process of research there was one key difference – with members of the group of young trainees who have reduced the number of weekly training, but who at the same time maintain a complete range of training and have not reduced the number of series, recorded an increase in muscle mass!

It was also the best answer to the question whether the methods Mike Mentzer really has an effect.

http://awesome-body.info

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Mike Mentzer Quote | Bodybuilding Motivation

Mike-Mentzer-motivation-quote


Mike-Mentzer-motivation-quote

Mike Mentzer Quote | Bodybuilding Motivation

FIRST YOU JUST WANT TO LOOK GOOD. THEN YOU REALISE IT’S DEEPER THAN THAT. Awesome Mike Mentzer motivational quote.
http://awesome-body.info

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Mike Mentzer qoutes about bodybuilding | Workout and Resting


mike-mentzer-quote-about-bodybuilding2

Mike Mentzer qoutes about bodybuilding

The Big Picture

Many bodybuilders apparently don’t understand that the big picture in bodybuilding involves two elements of equal value, literally 50-50, not 60-40 or 70-30 – but 50-50.

There’s no gain saying that the workout itself is important, it’s only 50 percent of the big picture. The second element, not one scintilla less important than the workout, is the rest period between workouts. And here’s why. The workout understand doesn’t actually “produce” muscular growth; it serves merely to “stimulate” the body’s growth mechanism into motion. It is the body itself – of course – that produces the growth, but ONLY if left undisturbed during a sufficient rest period. If you don’t rest enough, you don’t grow enough – if at all!

Mike Mentzer

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What are carbohydrates? | From Mike Mentzer Heavy Duty | Carbohydrates


What are carbohydrates

What are carbohydrates

If,in fact,protein has been the most over-emphasized nutrient, then carbohydrates have been the most maligned. The anticarbohydrate litany began in Britain in the early 1950, and reached its apex in the U.S., when diet books by so-called “experts” blamed carbohydrates for everything from obesityto schizophrenia! Talk about being estraged from realty. Now let’s debunk the theories of those who rail against carbohydrates.
One of the first things we lear in elementary biology is that life on the planet earth is dependent on the sun. We also learn that all of our food energy begins with plants. When we eat beef, for instance, we derive nutrients that the animal stored by eating grass.
Plants ger their energy in a process involving the sun called photosynthesis, which means “putting together with light”. What the sun is putting together are two of the most common chemicals on earth and in its atmosphere – carbon dioxide and water. Plants use oxygen to combine with carbon dioxide and water to form a hydrated carbon, or carbohydrate, as we commonly refer to it.
Carbohydrates are the primary fuel source of our muscles. And for high intensity training of the Heavy Duty variety or any other type, carbohydrate in the form of the simple sugar, glucose, is the only fuel. When we don’t take in enough sugar throught our diet to fuel muscular contractions,our bodies transform the amino acid alanine, derived from ingested protein or our own muscle tissue, into glucse. So carbohydrates also have a “protein-sparing effect,” which should cause any bodybuilder on a low-carb diet to reconsider such folly. Both our muscles and our central nervous system derive almost 100 percent of thir nutrition from sugar.
In addition to supplying energy, carbohydrates supply important building blocks of life. The ribose found in RNA and DNA is made from carbohydrates we consume. In light of all these facts, how can carbohydrates be poisonous toxins as asserted by the anti-carbohydrate people?
The fact is that carbohydrates can be dangerous, but only when consumed in exess. The body has a certain capacity for dealing with excess beyond need. But this capacity is not infinite, and can be overwhelmed. The same is true, however, with proteins and fats. Proof exists now that excess protein may be the most harmful of all, having been implicated in intestinal cancer, kidney disorders and a host of other degenerative diseases.

Carbohydrates, therefore, are a vital nutrient in the bodybuilder’s diet. In addition to providing the energy necessary for intense workouts, carbohydrates (in the form of glycogen) are stored in muscles, where each gram of glycogen “holds” three grams of water.

This is the reason you often feel loggy, and gain an inordinate amount of weight, the day after going on a carbohydrate binge. And living on low-carb diets inevitably results in periodic binges.

No matter how hard you try to abstain, the wisdom of the body wins out eventualy. and will attempt to “over-compensate” for the prolonged shortage of vital carbohydrates by making you eat everything in sight. This sets up a pattern of failure and frustration for many who equate such binges with moral weakness and personal shortcomings. These binges are the natural result of trying to live on a very low carbohydrate diet, as Dr. L. M. Vincent points out in his book on dancers, Competing With The Sylph. Why not avoid all that by folowing a well-balanced diet which has up to 60 percent carbohydrates?

The Wisdom of Mike Mentzer!

What are carbohydrates article is from Mike Mentzner book “Heavy Duty”.

Official website @ Mike Mentzer Heavy Duty

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Mr Olympia 1981 | Bodybuilding history | Franco Columbu 1981 Winner


Mr Olympia 1981

Mr Olympia 1981

The 1981 Mr. Olympia contest was an IFBB professional bodybuilding competition held on October 10, 1981 at the Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Columbus, Ohio.

Total prize money awarded was $50,000.

Following the 1980 Mr. Olympia controversy, a number of favored bodybuilders boycotted the event, including Frank Zane, Mike Mentzer, and Boyer Coe.

Franco Columbu won the contest despite it being his first Mr. Olympia appearance in five years and recovering from a major knee injury which severely impacted his leg muscle conditioning and overall symmetry.

Franco’s win was also controversial due to his friendship with Arnold Schwarzenegger who co-promoted the event, and Franco Fassi who was one of the judges.
CBS was contractually obligated to pay $20,000 for filming rights, but decided to not film the event.

Mr Olympia 1981 results

PlacePrizeNamePointsPosedownTotal
1$25,000Franco Columbu2942296
2Chris Dickerson2892291
3Tom Platz2882290
4Roy Callender2860286
5Danny Padilla2811282
6Jusup Wilkosz270270
7Dennis Tinerino265265
8Jonny Fuller264264
9Samir Bannout263263
10Roger Walker261261
11Hubert Metz252252
12Carlos Rodriguez249249
13Ed Corney246246
14Steve Davis241241
15Mike Katz237237
16Ken Waller235235
17Jorma Raty234234

Source: wikipedia.org

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Mr Olympia 1980 | Bodybuilding history | Arnold Schwarzenegger Winner


Mr Olympia 1980

Mr Olympia 1980

The 1980 Mr. Olympia contest was an IFBB professional bodybuilding competition held on October 4, 1980 at the Sydney Opera House in Sydney, Australia.

The event was one of the most controversial and debated competitions in bodybuilding history. While training for his acting role in the 1982 film Conan the Barbarian, Arnold Schwarzenegger stunned the bodybuilding world by unexpectedly coming out of retirement and entering the Mr. Olympia contest one day prior to the event and after having trained for only eight weeks prior. When asked about his decision to enter the competition, Arnold said “we’re going to start shooting the first few scenes (of Conan) in October, and so I really wanted to be muscular because the idea was that Conan was a very muscular, heroic looking guy, and that I should be in top shape… the closer I came to this competition more people started speculating on the idea that I would be competing and the more I started thinking about the possibility. And so around 3 weeks or 2 weeks ago I decided, well, I think it would be a kind of an interesting challenge to do something in 8 weeks that most of the guys do, preparing a year or two years in advance.”

Frank Zane, the defending three-time Mr. Olympia champion, entered the contest after recovering from a life-threatening injury. Although Zane had completely recovered and had retained his definition, much of his muscular size from the year before was missing. Other favorites at the competition, including Mike Mentzer, Chris Dickerson, and Boyer Coe, were in excellent condition making the 1980 event one of the most competitive Mr. Olympia contests.

After final judging, Arnold was declared the winner of the contest, a decision that was criticized by attendees and competitors because Arnold lacked his usual size and muscular definition. Many audience members booed as the results were announced. After accepting the runner-up position, Dickerson jumped off stage yelling “I can’t believe it!”. Although Coe and Mentzer were tied for fourth in scoring, Mentzer was given the fifth place award. Mentzer was outspoken in his belief that he was the victim of politics and conspiracy. Zane reportedly threw his trophy against the wall backstage.

During his acceptance speech, Arnold acknowledged how close the decision was, saying “I have to be very honest, that this was the highest level of competition that I have ever faced in any competition in my life”.

In the aftermath of the competition, many of the competitors, including Frank Zane, Coe, Mentzer, and Walker, vowed to boycott the 1981 contest. CBS Television attended and filmed the 1980 contest but decided not to air the contest on broadcast television as planned. It was the last time the Mr. Olympia contest was filmed by an American broadcast television network.

Arnold Schwarzenegger won his seventh Mr. Olympia and officially retired from professional bodybuilding.

Mr Olympia 1980 unlike previous contests which had two weight devisions (above and below 200 lbs), this contest had no weight divisions forcing large and small bodybuilders to compete directly against one another.
The loss and resulting controversy had a major impact on Mike Mentzer personally and professionally, it would be the last time he competed in professional bodybuilding.

Mr Olympia 1980 results

PlaceNamePrizePointsPosedownTotal
1.Arnold Schwarzenegger25000$2955300
2.Chris Dickerson2902292
3.Frank Zane2910291
4.Boyer Coe2800280
5.Mike Mentzer2800280
6.Roger Walker277277
7.Roy Callender277277
8.Dennis Tinerino276276
9.Tom Platz271271
10.Danny Padilla260260
11.Ed Corney256256
12.Tony Emmott254254
13.Roy Duval252252
14.Casey Viator252252
15.Samir Bannout251251
16.Ken Waller249249

Source: wikipedia.org